SUFISM: Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee, Sufi teacher – short video on Oneness

A Sufi teachers teaching re Oneness;

Excerpted from a talk by Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee “Oneness and Life” (http://www.workingwithoneness.org/Vid…)

“Sufism is truth without form.” — Ibn El-Jalali

“Sufism is truth without form.” — Ibn El-Jalali

Taoism and Sufism – The Open Path is a non-sectarian approach to spiritual realization

“Look, and it can’t be seen.
Listen, and it can’t be heard.
Reach, and it can’t be grasped.

Approach it, and there is no beginning;
Follow it, and there is no end.
You can’t know it,
but you can be it,
at ease in your own life.”

— Lao Tzu – from a Sufi source – http://sufiway.org/ – (a) home of The Open Path

The Open Path is a non-sectarian approach to spiritual realization offered by
the Sufi Way — a lineage of universal Sufism first introduced in the West in 1910 by the Indian mystic Inayat Khan.

Open Path trainings and retreats are held frequently in Europe and the United States. These programs are dedicated to the direct experience of our natural state — a state known as pure awareness, selflessness, nonduality, oneness, and by many other names. The Open Path is a process of natural enlightenment that belongs to everyone.

While the Open Path is inspired by the Sufi tradition, it is not limited to any doctrine or spiritual style, and you don’t have to “be a Sufi” to participate in Open Path programs. Rather, the Open Path is by its very nature open, emphasizing both direct experience and inclusivity of view and method.

In addition to Open Path programs, the Sufi Way offers a wide range of other programs, retreats, and individual guidance in Europe and North America, and community practice and activities through local centers.

Sufi Way teachings and practices draw from all traditions in a spirit of respect and creativity. Our heritage is both a classical Sufi lineage and an approach that is current and universal.

'Sufism is truth without form'. — Ibn El-Jalali via Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee juxtaposition Ibn Arabi

I liked this Sufi teaching – it seems to point to the same truth as nonduality in Hinduism and Buddhism;

Sufism is truth without form. — Ibn El-Jalali

SEE Extract from his book ‘Travelling the Path of Love: Sayings of Sufi Masters’
by Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

http://www.goldensufi.org/book_toc_chap_travelling.html

cf

‘Garden Among the Flames’ – Ibn ‘Arabi

(translated by Michael Sells)

Wonder,
A garden among the flames!
My heart can take on
Any form:
A meadow for gazelles,
A cloister for monks,
For the idols, sacred ground,
Ka’ba for the circling pilgrim,
the tables for the Torah,
the scrolls of the Qur’an.
My creed is love;
Wherever its caravan turns along the way,
That is my belief,
My faith.

BREATH MATTERS Take a look at these short…

BREATH MATTERS: Take a look at these short quotes from – Baha’i, Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Judaism, Sufism, Taoism

1) “Love is heaven’s kindly light, the Holy Spirit’s eternal breath that vivifieth the human soul.” Selections from the Writings of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Selection #12, p. 27

2) “Breath is the bridge which connects life to consciousness, which unites your body to your thoughts. Whenever your mind becomes scattered, use your breath as the means to take hold of your mind again.”
― Thích Nhất Hạnh, The Miracle of Mindfulness: An Introduction to the Practice of Meditation

3) So Jesus said to them again, “Peace be with you; as the Father has sent Me, I also send you.” And when He had said this, He breathed on them and said to them, “Receive the Holy Spirit. – John 20:21-22

4) “If you want to conquer the anxiety of life, live in the moment, live in the breath.” – Amit Ray, ‘Om Chanting and Meditation’

5) God made Adam’s body out of the dust of the earth. Later, the “man became a living soul” only after God “breathed into his nostrils the breath of life.” – Genesis 2:7

6) “At night, I open the window
and ask the moon to come
and press its face against mine.
Breathe into me.
Close the language-door
and open the love-window.
The moon won’t use the door,
only the window.”
― Rumi, A Year with Rumi: Daily Readings

7) Embracing Tao, you become embraced.
Supple, breathing gently, you become reborn.
Clearing your vision, you become clear.
Nurturing your beloved, you become impartial.
Opening your heart, you become accepted.
Accepting the World, you embrace Tao.
Bearing and nurturing,
Creating but not owning,
Giving without demanding,
Controlling without authority,
This is love.”
― Lao Tzu, The Teachings of Lao-Tzu: The Tao-Te Ching

AND A FEW MORE INTERESTING ONES!

“Dum spiro, spero” (While I breath I hope)
― Marcus Tullius Cicero

“You are where you need to be. Just take a deep breath.”
― Lana Parrilla

Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our
breath away.

  • Maya Angelou

Sioux Saying – “Life is like a buffalo. Its there and then its gone. Life comes and goes like the cloud of a moist breath on a cloudy morning.”

Hopi Saying – “Take the breath of the new dawn and make it part of you. It will give you strength.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson – “It is one of the most beautiful compensations of this life that no man can sincerely try to help another without helping himself.”“To laugh often and much; to win the respect of intelligent people and the affection of children…to leave the world a better place…to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived. This is to have succeeded.””It is not length of life, but the depth. All life is an experiment.”

“I took a deep breath and listened to the old brag of my heart. I am, I am, I am.”
― Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar

Definition of Sufism by William C Chittick ‘One…

Definition of Sufism by William C Chittick

‘One of the terms used in the classical texts to designate what I call “Sufism” is ma’rifa (or irfan), a term that literally means ‘knowledge’ or ‘recognition’.

However, the term connotes a special, deeper knowledge of things that can only be achieved by personal transformation, and hence it is often translated as ‘gnosis’. The goal and fruit of this type of knowledge is commonly explain by citing the Prophet’s saying, “He who knows (arifa) himself knows his Lord”

As the hadith suggests this sort of knowledge demands a simultaneous acquisition of both self-knowledge and God-knowledge. The text tell us repeatedly that it cannot be found in books.

Rather, it is already present in the heart, but it is hidden deep beneath the dross of ignorance, forgetfulness, outwardly oriented activity, and rational articulation. Access to this knowledge comes only by following the path that leads to human perfection.” p39 Sufism William C Chittick.

Sufism is the attempt of the individual mystic…

Sufism is the attempt of the individual mystic to achieve union with the divine Beloved, the Absolute from which human beings are separated by their base selves.

It typically involves a regimen of at least moderate self-denial, regular prayers, supplications, and the recitation of spiritual formulas and the divine names, and group chanting and textual study.

Among the greatest of Sufis were Rabi`a of Baghdad, Junayd, al-Hallaj, Bayazid Bistami, al-Ghazali, Ibn al-`Arabi and Jalalu’d-Din Rumi.

`Irfan is a later, especially Iranian and Shi`ite tradition of mysticism that is more individualist and more metaphysically oriented than many of the formal Sufi orders in Sunnism. Great figures here include Mir Damad, Mulla Sadra, Muhsin Fayz Kashani, and Shaykh Ahmad al-Ahsa’i.

http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jrcole/sufi.htm