Overture on the Nonduality of duality 4 Sufi

Overture on the Nonduality of duality 4 Sufi

FROM ISLAMIC-SUFI WRITINGS from
The Self is an ocean without a shore. Gazing upon it has no
beginning or end, in this world and the next.” Ibn al’Arabi (1165 – 1240)

Advertisements

SUFI: Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee: The need of the soul is like an empty cup

“The need of the soul is like an empty cup waiting, indeed longing, to be filled. The need must be great, and yet the seeker should not want anything, for the cup is always filled through the grace of God in whom we must put our total trust.”

SEE – http://www.spiritualityandpractice.com/book-reviews/view/9713/moshkel-gosha

The Sufi Meditation of the Heart – Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

The Sufi Meditation of the Heart – Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

True knowledge of God is gained when
the lover comes in contact with the Beloved
through secret communion with Him.

— TRADITIONAL SUFI SAYING

HISTORY

Sufism is a path of love. The Sufi is a traveler on the path of love, a wayfarer journeying back to God through the mysteries of the heart. For the Sufi the relationship to God is that of lover and Beloved, and Sufis are also known as lovers of God. The journey to God takes place within the heart, and for centuries Sufis have been traveling deep within themselves, into the secret chamber of the heart where lover and Beloved share the ecstasy of union……

To read the article go HERE – http://www.goldensufi.org/a_meditation_of_heart.html

Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee: ‘Mysticism is Living Love’s Oneness’. Are we all mystics?

‘Mysticism is living Love’s oneness’ so says contemporary Sufi teacher Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee.

At first I mis-read the title as ‘Mysticism: Living one’s Oneness’. I am wondering if that also is true?

Another way to put that is to say how far does integration of the individual’s (false) self a prerequisite for purity and lack of self-deception in our preparedness for mystical experience.

Perhaps a useful metaphor here is that of radio interference – from thoughts, feelings or the ‘world’ that keep us suffering negatives from the past – fear, etc – or from the ‘future’ anxiety etc.

I take it that almost everyone is a mystic in the same way that most people can walk, run and throw but not at Olympian levels. But it is part of the soul’s experience, in basic forms, for most people – except sociopathic and psychopathic people or those in whom there is a complete take-over by the egoic self.

I work with a simple definition ‘a mystical event is an experience, via truth, goodness or beauty, that enables us to transcend our little, frightened egoic self’. Such an event has probably happened to you today, or recently, when you were moved by a smile, or something a child said, or a beautiful landscape etc.

A third way of asking the question is ‘is our sensibility to possible mystical events conditional on a substantial degree of transformation of disturbing negatives into a higher degree of integration?

-0-

The article by Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee is HERE – http://www.huffingtonpost.com/llewellyn-vaughanlee/mysticism-living-loves-oneness_b_1304518.html

Juxtaposition: light from Sufi, Buddhist & Jewish sources

Juxtaposition:

The first quotation is by from Sufi teacher Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee;

SUFI:
“If we can allow ourselves to live an ordinary life while also staying awake to the great void at the center of all that is, then we can be this intermediary place between that intoxicating, mystical bliss of oblivion and the wonder of how the Divine creates and reveals Itself in all the forms of life. Our lives are the expression of this bridge – ordinary and extraordinary, all things in their place, everything free to be as it is, and our consciousness, our heart, free to be used as needed.”
-0-

BUDDHIST:
The great Master Dogen said, “To study the Buddha Way is to study the self, to study the self is to forget the self, and to forget the self is to be enlightened by the ten thousand things.” To be enlightened by the ten thousand things is to recognize the unity of the self and the ten thousand things.
-0-

JEWISH:
The search for reason ends at the shore of the known;
on the immense expanse beyond it
only the sense of the ineffable can glide.
It alone knows the route to that
which is remote from experience and understanding.

Neither is amphibious:
reason cannot go beyond the shore,
and the sense of the ineffable
is out of place where we measure, where we weigh…….

Citizens of two realms, we must all sustain dual allegiance:
we sense the ineffable in one realm;
we name and exploit reality in another.
Between the two we set up a system of references,
but can never fill the gap. – A J Heschel
-0-

NB The Sufi quote is from a book review on the wonderful ‘Spirituality & Practice site by Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat here;

http://www.spiritualityandpractice.com/book-reviews/excerpts/view/28020/for-love-of-the-real

Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee – his site is here – http://www.goldensufi.org/about_lvl.html

How important do you/I feel spiritually?

This is such a wonderful passage from Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee;

“If we can allow ourselves to live an ordinary life while also staying awake to the great void at the center of all that is, then we can be this intermediary place between that intoxicating, mystical bliss of oblivion and the wonder of how the Divine creates and reveals Itself in all the forms of life. Our lives are the expression of this bridge – ordinary and extraordinary, all things in their place, everything free to be as it is, and our consciousness, our heart, free to be used as needed.”

The Book review is of For Love of the Real
A Story of Life’s Mystical Secret
By Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee, Hilary Hart
A Sufi understanding of service and our lives as a bridge between the ordinary and the extraordinary.

From the Brussat’s book review;

-0-
…….many of the great Zen and Taoist teachers emphasized the ordinary and the dangers of spiritual importance:

” Emperor Wu: ‘I have built many temples, copied innumerable Sutras and ordained many monks since becoming Emperor. Therefore, I ask you, what is my merit?’

“Bodhidharma: ‘None whatsoever!’

“Emperor Wu: ‘Why no merit?’

“Bodhidharma: ‘Doing things for merit has an impure motive and will only bear the puny fruit of rebirth.’

“Emperor Wu, a little put out: ‘What then is the most important principle of Buddhism?’

“Bodhidharma: ‘Vast emptiness. Nothing sacred.’

“Emperor Wu, by now bewildered, and not a little indignant: ‘Who is this that stands before me?’

“Bodhidharma: ‘I do not know.’

“If we can allow ourselves to live an ordinary life while also staying awake to the great void at the center of all that is, then we can be this intermediary place between that intoxicating, mystical bliss of oblivion and the wonder of how the Divine creates and reveals Itself in all the forms of life. Our lives are the expression of this bridge – ordinary and extraordinary, all things in their place, everything free to be as it is, and our consciousness, our heart, free to be used as needed.”

SOURCE: http://www.spiritualityandpractice.com/book-reviews/excerpts/view/28020

Before you speak Let your words pass through…

Before you speak,
Let your words pass through three gates.
At the first gate ask yourself is it true?
At the second ask is it necessary?
At the third ask is it kind?

-Sufi saying – See more at: http://www.dailyevolver.com/#sthash.jUY3EBW6.dpuf