“When I drink tea it’s very pleasant to…

“When I drink tea it’s very pleasant to be aware
I am drinking cloud.” What happens when you die?
by Thich Nhat Hanh

…….You may think you are still alive but in fact you have been dying everyday, every minute, cells die and are born – for neither do we have funerals or birthdays (laughter).

Death is a very necessary condition of birth. With no death, there is no birth. They inter-are and happen in every moment to the experienced meditator. For instance a cloud may have died many times, into rain, streams, water. The cloud may want to wave to itself on earth! Rain is a continuation of the cloud. With a meditation practitioner nothing can hide itself. When I drink tea, it’s very pleasant to be aware I am drinking cloud.

When you are parents, you die and are reborn as your children. “You are my continuation, I love you.” The Buddha told us how to ensure a beautiful continuation – a compassionate thought, a beautiful thought. Forgiveness is our continuation. If anger, separation and hate arise, then we will not ensure a beautiful continuation. When we pronounce a word that is compassionate, good and beautiful that is our continuation.

When a cloud is polluted, the rain is polluted. So purifying thoughts, word and action creates a beautiful continuation. We can see the effects of our speech in our children. My disciples are my continuation ­– both monastic and lay. I want to transmit loving speech, action and thought. This is called karma in Buddhism.

This body of mine will disintegrate but my karma will continue – karma means action. My karma is already in the world. My continuation is everywhere in the world. When you look at one of my disciples walking with compassion, I know he is my continuation. I don’t want to transmit my negative emotions, I want to transform them before I transmit them. The dissolution of this body is not my end. Surely I will continue after the dissolution of this body. So don’t worry about my death, I am not going to die.

Let us meditate on the birth of a cloud. Does it have a birth certificate? (laughter) Examine the notion of birth – the notion that nothing can come from something, from no-one to someone. Is it possible for something to come from nothing? Scientifically this is not possible………………

from a talk by Thich Nhat Hanh

http://www.plumvillage.org/transcibe/7-what-happens-when-you-die.html

SEVEN FACTORS OF ENLIGHTENMENT In Buddhism the Seven…

SEVEN FACTORS OF ENLIGHTENMENT

In Buddhism, the Seven Factors of Enlightenment are:

MINDFULNESS (sati) i.e. to remember the Dhamma.
INVESTIGATION (dhamma vicaya) of the Dhamma.
ENERGY (viriya)
JOY or rapture (pīti)
RELAXATION or tranquility (passaddhi) of both body and mind
CONCENTRATION (samādhi) a calm, one-pointed state of concentration of mind[1]
EQUANIMITY (upekkha), to be able to face life in all its vicissitudes with calm of mind and tranquility, without disturbance, with dispassion and detachment.

This set of seven enlightenment factors is one of the “Seven Sets” of “Enlightenment-related states” (bodhipakkhiyadhamma).

The Pali word bojjhanga is a compound of bodhi (“enlightenment”) and anga (“factor”).[2]

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia – see ‘Seven Factors of Enlightenment’
Part of a series on
Buddhism

CULTIVATING MINDFULNESS Beginning or Deepening a Personal Meditation…

CULTIVATING MINDFULNESS
Beginning or Deepening a Personal Meditation Practice

Jon Kabat-Zinn

1. The real meditation is how you live your life.

2. In order to live life fully, you have to be present for it.

3. To be present, it helps to purposefully bring awareness to your moments – otherwise you may miss many of them.

4. You do that by paying attention on purpose, in the present moment, and non-judgmentally to whatever is arising inwardly and outwardly.
5. This requires a great deal of kindness toward yourself, which you deserve.

6. It helps to keep in mind that good or bad, pleasant or unpleasant, the present moment is the only time any of us are alive. Therefore, it’s the only time to learn, grow, see what is really going on, find some degree of balance, feel and express emotions such as love and appreciation, and do what we need to do to take care of ourselves – in other words, embody our intrinsic strength and beauty and wisdom – even in the face of pain and suffering.

7. So a gentle love affair with the present moment is important.

8. We do that through learning to rest in awareness of what is happening inwardly and outwardly moment by moment by moment – it is more a “being” than a “doing.”

9. Formal and informal meditation practices are specific ways in which you can ground, deepen, and accelerate this process, so it is useful to carve out some time for formal practice on a regular daily basis – maybe waking up fifteen or twenty minutes earlier than you ordinarily would to catch some time for ourselves.

10. We bring awareness to our moments only as best we can.

11. We are not trying to create a special feeling or experience – simply to realize that this moment is already very special – because you are alive and awake in it.

12. This is hard, but well worth it.

13. It takes a lot of practice.

14. Lots of practice

15. But you have a lot of moments – and we can treat each one as a new beginning.

16. So there are always new moments to open up to if we miss some.

17. We do all this with a huge amount of self-compassion.

18. And remember, you are not your thoughts or opinions, your likes or dislikes. They are more like weather patterns in your mind that you can be aware of – like clouds moving across the sky, – and so don’t have to be imprisoned by.

19. Befriending yourself in this way is the adventure of a lifetime, and hugely empowering.

20. Try it for a few weeks – it grows on you.

From Cultivating Mindfulness (PDF) by Jon Kabat-Zinn, a helpful guide offered at the site Mindfulness CDs, with links to CDs for purchase based on the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction clinic series and other books from Kabat-Zinn, links to talks for free download, recent articles, etc.

Know ye that by the world is…

Know ye that by “the world” is meant your unawareness of Him Who is your Maker, and your absorption in aught else but Him. The “life to come,” on the other hand, signifieth the things that give you a safe approach to God, the All-Glorious, the Incomparable. Whatsoever deterreth you, in this Day, from loving God is nothing but the world. Flee it, that ye may be numbered with the blest. Should a man wish to adorn himself with the ornaments of the earth, to wear its apparels, or partake of the benefits it can bestow, no harm can befall him, if he alloweth nothing whatever to intervene between him and God, for God hath ordained every good thing, whether created in the heavens or in the earth, for such of His servants as truly believe in Him. Eat ye, O people, of the good things which God hath allowed you, and deprive not yourselves from His wondrous bounties. Render thanks and praise unto Him, and be of them that are truly thankful.

Modern clinical psychology and psychiatry since the 1970s…

Modern clinical psychology and psychiatry since the 1970s have developed a number of therapeutic applications based on the concept of mindfulness (Pali sati or Sanskrit smriti) in Buddhist meditation.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mindfulness_(psychology)

awareness; inclination to be mindful or aware; paying attention on purpose, in the present moment, and non-judgementally
en.wiktionary.org/wiki/mindfulness

Non-judgmental, undistracted state that is a goal of meditation and involves being aware of oneself and one’s surroundings.
http://www.appalachianspa.com/spatreatment_glossary.html

A popular meditation method based on Buddhist principles and developed by Dr. Jon Kabat-Zinn at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Mindfulness is a state of compassionate, non-judgmental awareness of the moment.
http://www.australiannaturaltherapistsassociation.com.au/resources/glo…

The mental quality of non-judgmental attention that can see things directly as they appear in the present moment.
http://www.gaiahouse.co.uk/page.php

the ability to be fully aware of what one is experiencing, without becoming at the same time, lost in that same experience
thewhiteelephant.org/the_white_elephant/glossary.html

sati (q.v.); s. Satipaṭṭhāna. – Right m.: s. sacca, magga.
http://www.budsas.org/ebud/bud-dict/dic3_m.htm

The energy to be here and to witness deeply everything that happens in the present moment, aware of what is going on within and without.
http://www.ccml.info/glossary/

Mindfulness is a technique in which a person becomes intentionally aware of his or her thoughts and actions in the present moment, non-judgmentally.
http://www.spiritual-experiences.com/glossary.php

This is one of the four DBT skills that students are taught. The purpose of mindfulness is to help students have more awareness of themselves in the present moment. Through awareness, students can then learn to understand their own behavior. …
http://www.northstarcenter.com/drugtreatmentterms.html

The calm awareness of one’s body functions, feelings, content of consciousness, or consciousness itself. An elevated level of awareness.
http://www.relaxyourlifenow.com/glossary/

Practicing mindfulness in Buddhism means to perform consciously all activities and to assume the attitude of “pure observation,” through which clear knowledge, i,e, clearly conscious thinking and acting, is attained. …
http://www.springsgreetingcards.com/catalogs/store.asp

A form of meditation that was originally developed in the Buddhist traditions of Asia but is practiced today by many, from meditators in monasteries to physicians in stress-reduction clinics. Mindfulness can be defined as awareness of each moment as it occurs and a purposeful attention. …
http://www.isabellehutton.com/alternativehealing_resources.html

The ability to focus all your attention on one area while staying alert, calm, and relaxed, as you witness your own body, mind, emotions, and spirit.
http://www.niawellness.com/nia_glossary

(dran-pa) is the mental factor that keeps the mental hold (‘ dzin-cha) on an object. It is like a “mental glue” and has three functions:
http://www.berzinarchives.com/web/en/archives/sutra/level2_lamrim/a…

(smrty-upasthana, yinian): Basic teaching whereby one is mindful of one’s body, feelings, thoughts, and phenomena.
buddhism.org/Sutras/DHARMA/GLOSSARY/IndexGlossaryM.h…

The quality of non-attached, non-judgmental observation of experience.
http://www.wildmind.org/background/buddhist-meditation/meditation…

Gentle all-round awareness.
oaks.nvg.org/buddord.html

Gleanings pocket p346 Disencumber yourselves of all attachment…

Gleanings pocket p346

Disencumber yourselves of all attachment to this world and the vanities thereof. …….
Know ye that by “the world” is meant your unawareness of Him Who is your Maker, and your absorption in aught else but Him. The “life to come,” on the other hand, signifieth the things that give you a safe approach to God, the All-Glorious, the Incomparable. Whatsoever deterreth you, in this Day, from loving God is nothing but the world. Flee it, that ye may be numbered with the blest.

We need to develop and refine our minds…

We need to develop and refine our minds and its capacities for seeing and knowing, for recognizing and transcending whatever motives and concepts and habits of unawareness may have generated or compounded the difficulties we find ourselves embroiled within, a mind that knows and sees in new ways is motivated differently. This is the same as saying we need to return to our original, untouched, unconditioned mind.

How can we do this? Precisely by taking a moment to get out of our own way, to get outside of the stream of thought and sit by the bank and rest for a while in things as they are underneath our thinking, or as Soen Sa Nim liked to say, “before thinking.” That means being with what is for a moment, and trusting what is deepest and best in yourself, even if it doesn’t make any sense to the thinking mind. Jon Kabat-Zinn