Mahamrityunjay Mantra 108 times By Shankar Sahney – beautiful chanting

Exquisite chanting – Mahamrityunjaya Mantra (Hinduism) Mantra singer Hein Braat & Medicine Buddha’s Mantra (Buddhism)

Mahamrityunjaya Mantra (Hinduism) Mantra singer Hein Braat & Medicine Buddha’s Mantra (Buddhism)

Your subconscious mind and meditation using a mantra

Federico Racchi has an interesting blog and an article entitled ‘How to Train your Subconscious Mind’.

In the section concerning training the subconscious mind via meditation he says;

“Meditation is one of the best ways to learn to focus your mind while increasing your awareness. Meditation is not only an effective way of training your subconscious mind it also has excellent health and stress relieving benefits. Practising meditation does not require you to undergo special training or acquiring complex skills. It is a simple practice that can be performed in the comfort of your own home in as little as ten minutes a day.

There are many different ways to perform meditation but one of the easiest is to simply find a comfortable, quiet place where you will not be disturbed.Start by simply observing your breathing and allowing your body to relax. Then repeat either in your mind or out loud what is called a mantra. This is a single word or phrase, one of the most popular mantra’s being either “Ohm” or “One”.

Keep repeating your mantra for between 5 – 10 minutes. If thoughts enter your mind, note them, and then allow them to drift away. Over time try to increase your meditation training so that you are practising for at least 15 – 20 minutes each day. As you continue to practice meditation you should find that you have an increased sense of both yourself and your surroundings. This is part of the process of you becoming more attuned to your subconscious.”

In addition to mantra meditation Frederico suggests a combination with creative expression of some kind.

To read the rest of Frederico’s article go here – http://selfhelprobot.com/how-to-train-your-subconscious-mind

CHANTING Don't miss this sublime music by Hein Braat

Exquisite – 3,463,108 plays on youTube!

Mahamrityunjaya Mantra (Hinduism) & Medicine Buddha’s Mantra (Buddhism)
Mantra singer: Hein Braat

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahamrit…

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medicine…

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddhism…

http://www.heinbraat.com/en

MANTRAS & HEIN BRAAT’S BIOGRAPHY – http://heinbraat.com/biography/

‘Biography Hein Braat
After practicing Hatho Yoga, Purna Yoga and Kriya Yoga for many years my opinion of what Yoga is changed. Every effort to search inward for universal love, light and unity, I consider to be a form of yoga. The Vedic Sanskrit “Sloka” and “Stotra” I do not sing in the traditional Hindu way, but I try to make maximum use of the powerful sounds of the Sanskrit language. Therefore, I consider correct pronunciation of vital importance. When allowing the melody to flow into words, instead of trying to fit the words into the melody, (like we do in Europe most of the time) the power of each word is preserved. If you compare words with vehicles, you could say that the fuel for each vehicle consists of tone, emotion and concentration.

Mantra
Since the age of thirteen, music has been a determining factor in my life. At first for pleasure, later on a professional basis. When I reached the age of forty my friend Hans van Druten advised me to practice Yoga for therapeutical purposes. I also happened to meet Yoga teacher Gerard van Wijk, who had just returned to the Netherlands, after spending three years as a monk in the Shivananda Ashram in Rishikesh, Northern India. Apart from teaching Purna Yoga he also sang and played a Hindu organ (Bat) during relaxation. He had an impressive way of singing and when I asked him what it was he had been singing, he explained that it was a Sloka from the “Rig-Veda”. That was the first time I heard someone sing a mantra. You could feel that it had to do with concentration and transfer of energy through the voice. After practicing this different way of singing at home, Hans van Druten gave me the lyrics to an old Sanskrit psalm and suggested I make a recording of it so it could be used in one of his seminars. This particular seminar focused on physically experiencing music in order to locate traumas. This psalm was the Gayatri mantra. Subsequently, I studied sitar for four years to improve my understanding of Hindu music and culture and the Sanskrit language for one year to master correct pronunciation.

Hein Braat, famous singer of MantraMusic
The Indian approach to music is fundamentally different from the European one. All music is played in one chord. The “C” chord (Bramha’s tone). The music is called “Raga” which literally means emotion. In previous times Raga was considered temple music and the various tone scales were ascribed to different emotions.

In ancient Yoga teaching, the human body was divided in 3 octaves:
1. The first octave: from the feet to the first chakra.
2. The second octave: from the first chakra up to and including the sixth chakra.
3. The third octave: from the sixth chakra up to and including the seventh chakra
In Europe one octave consists of twelve tones. In India one octave consists of 24 tones (1/4 tones). So the energy body of a human being is supposed to be made up of 72 “shrutis” or musical touch points. Musicians improvised on the tones of the Raga and played on the “shrutis” to achieve a specific state of mind. Modern day Indian Raga music is only distantly related to the old temple Raga.

Melody and Words
I still handle words and melody as I did before. Firstly, I focus on correct pronunciation of each word. Then I look for the power in each word (keeping in mind that Sanskrit is a sound language). I master the rhythm of the text. Subsequently, I concentrate on the central meaning of the text and transfer emotion into melody. Finally, I pour the melody into words. When you pronounce Sanskrit in the correct way, you can feel the sounds in different places inside your body. You are especially aware of this during singing. Not only is singing an emotional and mental happening, but it is also a very physical thing.

Spoken, thought or sung Mantra can be a way of meditation and so creating the possibility to experience the mystical essence of the great world religions. Universal love, light and unity.’

Interesting Indeed these are only a few of…

Interesting?……

Indeed, these are only a few of the definitions-of-God found in the Aryan Vedas and Upanishads, but some of the profounder ones. Let me give those God-definitions again. The rishis who wrote the Upanishads defined God as:

— Pure Consciousness

and also

— Bliss (ananda)

and also

— The source of exterior phenomena, or the “creator,” whether postulated as a theory and only thought about, or personally known

and also they defined God as

— Inner blissful sound (Aum) and light (jyoti) experienced by those who succeed in stilling their minds (succeed in yoga).

The average man can easily prove two of the above God-definitions to himself, as existent; as real. All have experienced bliss. All experience consciousness. (We swim in consciousness as a fish swims in water. To think “I am, I think” is to experience consciousness.) And a few, less average, experience and know the inner Aum and inner jyotii through chastity and assiduous yogic effort.

One of the absurd things about atheists, especially the juvenile variety running about today — is that they usually have not studied religion, much less sought to experience religious truths within. The word “philosophy” references a multifarious variety of ideas. How much more the words “God” and “religion.” They, likewise, refer to a multifarious variety of things. The modern amateur atheist — and many of the professionals — doesn’t bother specifying which definition-of-God he is rejecting. He has in his head some concept of God thinking “This is what the word God means, everybody knows.” Then he states his rejection of the Mickey Mouse idea. Maybe that of a particular religious sect or Sunday School teacher he encountered when he was a child, and he feels proud of himself. Most atheists are not even aware that God is defined as as such things as “bliss” in the venerable religions.

Thus it is easy to say to the atheist: “Like the rishis, I define God as bliss. I have experienced bliss. So I know God exists.”

Atheism is the sandbox of neurotic children angry about past irritations or offenses from “religious” people. In other words, their atheist stance is emotional and not the product of sincere or strenuous inquiry. Aside from unfamiliarity with rich religious ideas or subtle definitions of God, the atheist has seldom sought out God himself. How should one expect to find any thing if he never seeks for it? Especially a thing that is mysterious or transcendental? Thus modern atheists are fools, neurotic, unimaginative men, and generally completely uneducated about the subject of religion. We have no need to bother with them. They have always been around. This site is for the God-seekers. Aum.

http://celibacy.info/Religious_Knowledge_Spiritual_Vision.html