Francis Lucille: “What We Are Speaks More Loudly Than What We See”

Francis Lucille was (is?) Rupert Spira’s teacher;

YouTube Notes:

Interview with the spiritual teacher of the tradition of Advaita Vedanta (non-duality) Francis Lucille for Buddha at the Gas Pump.

In this conversation, amongst other things, we explore the intellectual understanding of enlightenment, how our neglected bodies change after becoming awakened and if consciousness is limited. Francis Lucille – Buddha at the Gas Pump Interview:

Francis Lucille was Rupert Spira’s teacher. See https://batgap.com/francis-lucille/

Francis Lucille is a spiritual teacher of the tradition of Advaita Vedanta (non-duality). He became a disciple of Jean Klein, a French Advaita teacher whom he met in 1975.

This was the beginning of a close association that lasted until the death of his friend and spiritual master in 1998.

Jean Klein‘s own guru, “Panditji” Rao, whom he met in India in the nineteen-fifties, was a college professor in Bangalore who taught Sanskrit and belonged to a lineage of traditional Advaita Vedanta teachers. Francis Lucille speaks about one thing: awareness, our true nature, the Absolute.

This is the ancient teaching of non-duality, the common ground of Advaita Vedanta, Ch’an Buddhism, Zen, Taoism and Sufism, the same common ground which is at the core of the message left behind by the founders of all great religions.

In a loving, open, blissfully peaceful manner, Francis leads us to a deep understanding that what we are is love, the pure awareness behind and between all the activities of the mind.

“Everything is created from moment to moment, always new.”

Like fireworks, this universe is a celebration and you are the spectator contemplating the eternal Fourth of July of your absolute splendor. – Francis Lucille’s quote.   SOURCE

“All blessings are divine in origin

“All blessings are divine in origin, but none can be compared with this power of intellectual investigation and research, which is an eternal gift producing fruits of unending delight.”
(Abdu’l-Baha, The Promulgation of Universal Peace, p. 49)

How many words the world contains But all…

How many words the world contains! But all have
one meaning. When you smash the jugs,
the water is one.
Rumi quoted in Chittick (1989 p. 8)

We should not pretend to understand the world only by the intellect.
The judgement of the intellect is only part of the truth.
— Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961)

A fact only becomes knowledge when it has meaning, when a student can see where it fits into the world in general.

(First line of description of the curriculum at the
Heschel-inspired Columbus Jewish Day School.)
http://www.cjds.org/curric.html

‘Love Ego & Presence’ Kabir Helminski The Knowing…

‘Love, Ego & Presence’ – Kabir Helminski The Knowing Heart: A Sufi Path of Transformation pp49-50

“We do not reach love completely on our own. If we are loveless in and of ourselves, it is because we are living with our center of gravity in the false self. The false self is created from the desires and compulsions of our own separateness. This false self believes strongly in its own existence as separate from the rest of life, and it recruits the intellect to help defend this illusion at the expense of the whole of the mind.

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Contemplation is the highest expression of man’s…

“Contemplation is the highest expression of man’s intellectual and spiritual life. It is that life itself, fully awake, fully active, fully aware that it is alive. It is spiritual wonder. It is spontaneous awe at the sacredness of life, of being. It is gratitude for life, for awareness, and for being. It is a vivid realization of the fact that life and being in us proceed from an invisible, transcendent and infinitely abundant Source. Contemplation is, above all, an awareness of the reality of that Source.”

Thomas Merton
New Seeds of Contemplation