If you love Oneness beyond, and at the heart of, the great Traditions please read this – ‘I = Awareness’

Yesterday in our ‘One Garden’ session we celebrated the fact that at least one academic has bridged the gap between academic research and teaching and the age-old wisdom core of the great Traditions.

Yesterday we used a paper entitled ‘I = Awareness’ by a professor of psychiatry Arthur J Deikman.

If you are at all interested in inter-spirituality, nonduality or interfaith understanding this paper is absolutely key!

You can read, or re-read, the paper here – http://www.deikman.com/awareness.html

Professor Deikman’s spiritual path included Buddhism and Sufism.

deikman Arthur J

Arthur J. Deikman (September 27, 1929 – September 2, 2013) was a clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco, and a member of the editorial board of the ‘Journal of Humanistic Psychology’ and ‘Human Givens’. He was also a contributor to ‘The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease’.

About Deikman and his work – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_J._Deikman

Articles by Arthur J Deikman – Dig deep there are many more articles on several layers down – http://www.deikman.com/

Books by Arthur Deikman – https://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=deikman

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‘I’ = AWARENESS

‘I’ = AWARENESS by Arthur J. Deikman

Deikman from within the new (newish) field of published a paper in the Journal of Consciousness Studies strikingly entitled ‘I’ = Awareness.

This stopped me in my tracks since it is what nonduality and mystical teachings have been teaching for thousands of years – has at least some small bit of Academe caught up?

Abstract:
Introspection reveals that the core of subjectivity — the `I’ — is identical to awareness. This `I’ should be differentiated from the various aspects of the physical person and its mental contents which form the `self’. Most discussions of consciousness confuse the `I’ and the `self’. In fact, our experience is fundamentally dualistic — not the dualism of mind and matter — but that of the `I’ and that which is observed. The identity of awareness and the `I’ means that we know awareness by being it, thus solving the problem of the infinite regress of observers. It follows that whatever our ontology of awareness may be, it must also be the same for `I’.

Published in Journal of Consciousness Studies, 3, No. 4 (1996), pp. 350-6

Arthur J. Deikman was a clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco, and a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Humanistic Psychology and Human Givens.

http://www.imprint.co.uk/online/Deikman.html