Overture on the Nonduality of duality 6 Hinduism

Overture on the Nonduality of duality 6 Hinduism

FROM HINDU ADVAITA NONDUALITY TEACHINGS
‘The world is unreal; only Brahman is real; Brahman is the world’.

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CHANTING Don't miss this sublime music by Hein Braat

Exquisite – 3,463,108 plays on youTube!

Mahamrityunjaya Mantra (Hinduism) & Medicine Buddha’s Mantra (Buddhism)
Mantra singer: Hein Braat

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahamrit…

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medicine…

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddhism…

http://www.heinbraat.com/en

MANTRAS & HEIN BRAAT’S BIOGRAPHY – http://heinbraat.com/biography/

‘Biography Hein Braat
After practicing Hatho Yoga, Purna Yoga and Kriya Yoga for many years my opinion of what Yoga is changed. Every effort to search inward for universal love, light and unity, I consider to be a form of yoga. The Vedic Sanskrit “Sloka” and “Stotra” I do not sing in the traditional Hindu way, but I try to make maximum use of the powerful sounds of the Sanskrit language. Therefore, I consider correct pronunciation of vital importance. When allowing the melody to flow into words, instead of trying to fit the words into the melody, (like we do in Europe most of the time) the power of each word is preserved. If you compare words with vehicles, you could say that the fuel for each vehicle consists of tone, emotion and concentration.

Mantra
Since the age of thirteen, music has been a determining factor in my life. At first for pleasure, later on a professional basis. When I reached the age of forty my friend Hans van Druten advised me to practice Yoga for therapeutical purposes. I also happened to meet Yoga teacher Gerard van Wijk, who had just returned to the Netherlands, after spending three years as a monk in the Shivananda Ashram in Rishikesh, Northern India. Apart from teaching Purna Yoga he also sang and played a Hindu organ (Bat) during relaxation. He had an impressive way of singing and when I asked him what it was he had been singing, he explained that it was a Sloka from the “Rig-Veda”. That was the first time I heard someone sing a mantra. You could feel that it had to do with concentration and transfer of energy through the voice. After practicing this different way of singing at home, Hans van Druten gave me the lyrics to an old Sanskrit psalm and suggested I make a recording of it so it could be used in one of his seminars. This particular seminar focused on physically experiencing music in order to locate traumas. This psalm was the Gayatri mantra. Subsequently, I studied sitar for four years to improve my understanding of Hindu music and culture and the Sanskrit language for one year to master correct pronunciation.

Hein Braat, famous singer of MantraMusic
The Indian approach to music is fundamentally different from the European one. All music is played in one chord. The “C” chord (Bramha’s tone). The music is called “Raga” which literally means emotion. In previous times Raga was considered temple music and the various tone scales were ascribed to different emotions.

In ancient Yoga teaching, the human body was divided in 3 octaves:
1. The first octave: from the feet to the first chakra.
2. The second octave: from the first chakra up to and including the sixth chakra.
3. The third octave: from the sixth chakra up to and including the seventh chakra
In Europe one octave consists of twelve tones. In India one octave consists of 24 tones (1/4 tones). So the energy body of a human being is supposed to be made up of 72 “shrutis” or musical touch points. Musicians improvised on the tones of the Raga and played on the “shrutis” to achieve a specific state of mind. Modern day Indian Raga music is only distantly related to the old temple Raga.

Melody and Words
I still handle words and melody as I did before. Firstly, I focus on correct pronunciation of each word. Then I look for the power in each word (keeping in mind that Sanskrit is a sound language). I master the rhythm of the text. Subsequently, I concentrate on the central meaning of the text and transfer emotion into melody. Finally, I pour the melody into words. When you pronounce Sanskrit in the correct way, you can feel the sounds in different places inside your body. You are especially aware of this during singing. Not only is singing an emotional and mental happening, but it is also a very physical thing.

Spoken, thought or sung Mantra can be a way of meditation and so creating the possibility to experience the mystical essence of the great world religions. Universal love, light and unity.’

BREATH MATTERS Take a look at these short…

BREATH MATTERS: Take a look at these short quotes from – Baha’i, Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Judaism, Sufism, Taoism

1) “Love is heaven’s kindly light, the Holy Spirit’s eternal breath that vivifieth the human soul.” Selections from the Writings of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Selection #12, p. 27

2) “Breath is the bridge which connects life to consciousness, which unites your body to your thoughts. Whenever your mind becomes scattered, use your breath as the means to take hold of your mind again.”
― Thích Nhất Hạnh, The Miracle of Mindfulness: An Introduction to the Practice of Meditation

3) So Jesus said to them again, “Peace be with you; as the Father has sent Me, I also send you.” And when He had said this, He breathed on them and said to them, “Receive the Holy Spirit. – John 20:21-22

4) “If you want to conquer the anxiety of life, live in the moment, live in the breath.” – Amit Ray, ‘Om Chanting and Meditation’

5) God made Adam’s body out of the dust of the earth. Later, the “man became a living soul” only after God “breathed into his nostrils the breath of life.” – Genesis 2:7

6) “At night, I open the window
and ask the moon to come
and press its face against mine.
Breathe into me.
Close the language-door
and open the love-window.
The moon won’t use the door,
only the window.”
― Rumi, A Year with Rumi: Daily Readings

7) Embracing Tao, you become embraced.
Supple, breathing gently, you become reborn.
Clearing your vision, you become clear.
Nurturing your beloved, you become impartial.
Opening your heart, you become accepted.
Accepting the World, you embrace Tao.
Bearing and nurturing,
Creating but not owning,
Giving without demanding,
Controlling without authority,
This is love.”
― Lao Tzu, The Teachings of Lao-Tzu: The Tao-Te Ching

AND A FEW MORE INTERESTING ONES!

“Dum spiro, spero” (While I breath I hope)
― Marcus Tullius Cicero

“You are where you need to be. Just take a deep breath.”
― Lana Parrilla

Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our
breath away.

  • Maya Angelou

Sioux Saying – “Life is like a buffalo. Its there and then its gone. Life comes and goes like the cloud of a moist breath on a cloudy morning.”

Hopi Saying – “Take the breath of the new dawn and make it part of you. It will give you strength.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson – “It is one of the most beautiful compensations of this life that no man can sincerely try to help another without helping himself.”“To laugh often and much; to win the respect of intelligent people and the affection of children…to leave the world a better place…to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived. This is to have succeeded.””It is not length of life, but the depth. All life is an experiment.”

“I took a deep breath and listened to the old brag of my heart. I am, I am, I am.”
― Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar

Krishna the mouth piece of Hinduism in all…

Krishna, …….the mouth-piece of Hinduism in all its manifestations, finds it perfectly natural that different men should have different methods and even apparently differently objects of worship. All roads lead to Rome–provided, of course, that it is Rome and not some other city which the traveler really wishes to reach.

Aldous Huxley in Introduction to the Bhagavad Gita
(Translation of Bhagavad-Gita by Swami Prabhavananda and Christopher Isherwood.)

The value of the Upanishads however does not…

The value of the Upanishads, however, does not rest upon their
antiquity, but upon the vital message they contain for all times
and all peoples. There is nothing peculiarly racial or local in
them. The ennobling lessons of these Scriptures are as practical
for the modern world as they were for the Indo-Aryans of the
earliest Vedic age.

Their teachings are summed up in two
Maha-Vakyam or “great sayings”:–Tat twam asi (That thou art) and
Aham Brahmasmi (I am Brahman). This oneness of Soul and God lies
at the very root of all Vedic thought, and it is this dominant
ideal of the unity of all life and the oneness of Truth which
makes the study of the Upanishads especially beneficial at the
present moment.

One of the most eminent of European Orientalists writes: “If we
fix our attention upon it (this fundamental dogma of the Vedanta
system) in its philosophical simplicity as the identity of God
and the Soul, the Brahman and the Atman, it will be found to
possess a significance reaching far beyond the Upanishads, their
time and country; nay, we claim for it an inestimable value for
the whole race of mankind.

The Upanishads

Translated and Commentated

by

Swami Paramananda

From the Original Sanskrit Text

http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/3283/pg3283.txt

DRINKING SWEET WATER FROM 8 WELLS Dialogue around…

DRINKING SWEET WATER FROM 8 WELLS
Dialogue around a virtual campfire and face-to-face

Baha’i,
Buddhism,
Christianity,
Hinduism,
Islam,
Judaism,
Quaker
Taoism