Three gifts: faith, hope, and love. – Richard Rohr

Three gifts: faith, hope, and love.

Faith that the Incarnation is true not only in Jesus but in each of our lives. God is with us.

Hope that the sorrows and injustices in the world are not the last word. From death comes life.

Love as the foundational energy of our universe and of our very beings.

SEE – https://cac.org/richard-rohr/daily-meditations

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When Oneness Becomes a Fundamentalist Belief

When Oneness Becomes a Fundamentalist Belief

The last few reflections have discussed how beliefs often fuel separation and conflict. These reflections are not meant to encourage you to suppress belief. Form is none other than formlessness.

To suppress belief is to deny the empty awareness from which it arises. Nothing is appearing as everything including every belief, idea, and view. What is being pointed to here is the seeing of how the dream self is born from identification with beliefs, creating illusory conflict and separation.

The view that “all is One” is a correct view relatively speaking. Stated another way, it is clearer to say “all is One” than to say “there are four.” But form is relative. Views are clear only in relation to other views. That is the nature of dualistic language.

The non-duality to which the word “Oneness” points cannot be expressed. In failing to realize the inexpressibility of non-duality, the mind can turn Oneness or any other spiritual conclusion (i.e., “no self”) into a fundamentalist belief.

How will you know your spiritual conclusion has become a fundamentalist belief? You will find yourself in conflict with all others who do not agree with your particular conception of Oneness. You will stop listening and learning, believing that you own the truth.

The pure seeing of identification with belief in Oneness allows identification with that belief to dissolve naturally. What is left is genuine Oneness, free from the “me” who would own it.

~ From: Reflections of the One Life, by Scott Kiloby http://www.kiloby.com/

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From Peter’s Pearls

Web Site: http://www.peterspearls.com.au

JUXTAPOSITIONS Hildegard of Bingen Baha’u’llah Benjamin Franklin Karen…

JUXTAPOSITIONS – Hildegard of Bingen, Baha’u’llah, Benjamin Franklin, Karen Armstrong,
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“We cannot live in a world that is interpreted for us by others. An interpreted world is not a hope. Part of the terror is to take back our own listening. To use our own voice. To see our own light.”― Hildegard of Bingen
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O SON OF SPIRIT!
The best beloved of all things in My sight is Justice; turn not away therefrom if thou desirest Me, and neglect it not that I may confide in thee. By its aid thou shalt see with thine own eyes and not through the eyes of others, and shalt know of thine own knowledge and not through the knowledge of thy neighbor. Ponder this in thy heart; how it behooveth thee to be. Verily justice is My gift to thee and the sign of My loving-kindness. Set it then before thine eyes. (2nd Arabic Hidden Word by Baha’u’llah)
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Benjamin Franklin, “The way to see by faith is to close the eye of reason.”
As a friend says – “In religion, you have to do it to ‘get’ it.”
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Karen Armstrong sums up mythos and logos in a book review on Creationism by Michael Ruse in the New Scientist.

“In the pre-modern world, it was generally understood that there were two ways of arriving at truth. Plato called them mythos and logos. Neither was superior to the other. Logos (reason; science) was exact, practical and essential to human life. To be effective, it had to correspond to external reality. Myth expressed the more elusive, puzzling aspects of human experience. It has often been called a primitive form of psychology, which helped people negotiate their inner world…

Myth could not help you create efficient technology or run your society. But logos had its limits too. If you became a refugee or witnessed a terrible natural catastrophe, you did not simply want a logical explanation; you also wanted myth to show you how to manage your grief. With the advent of our scientific modernity, however, logos achieved such spectacular results that myth was discredited, and now, in popular parlance a myth is something that did not happen, that is untrue. But some religious people also began to read religious myths as though they were logos.

The conflict between science and faith has thus been based on a misunderstanding of the nature of scriptural discourse. Many people, including those who are religious, find it difficult to think mythically, because our education and society is fuelled entirely by logos. This has made religion impossible for many people in the west, and it could be argued that much of the stridency of Christian fundamentalism is based on a buried fear of creeping unbelief.

In the pre-modern world, it was considered dangerous to mix mythos and logos, because each had a different sphere of competence. Much of the heat could be taken out of the evolution versus creation struggle if it were admitted that to read the first chapter of Genesis as though it were an exact account of the origins of life is not only bad science; it is also bad religion.”

Let us each examine our faith If…

“Let us each examine our faith. If it is rooted in love, mercy, kindness, and compassion, we are on the right track.”

The Mystic Hours, A Daybook of Interspiritual Wisdom & Devotion
Wayne Teasdale

Who explains the relationship between faith and reason…

Who explains the relationship between faith and reason better than Heschel?

“Reality is not exhausted by knowledge. Inaccessible to research are the ultimate facts. All scientific conclusions are based on axioms, all reasoning depends ultimately upon faith. Faith is virgin thinking, preceding all transcendent knowledge. To believe is to abide at the extremities of spirit.”

“There is neither advance nor service without faith. Nobody can rationally explain why he should sacrifice his life and his happiness for the sake of the good.

The conviction that I must obey the ethical imperatives is not derived from logical argument but originates from an intuitive certitude, in a certitude of faith.

There is no conspiracy against reason, no random obstinacy, no sluggish inertia of mind or smug self-assurance entrenched behind the walls of believing.

Faith does not detach a man from thinking, it does not suspend reason. It is opposed not to knowledge but to backwardness and dullness, to indifferent aloofness to the essence of living. … It is a distortion to regard reason and faith as alternatives.

Reason is a necessary coefficient of faith. Faith without explication by reason is mute, reason without faith is deaf. There can be a true symbiosis of reason and faith.”

“The Holy Dimension”, p. 338 – http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Abraham_Joshua_Heschel

“The worship of reason is arrogance and betrays…

“The worship of reason is arrogance and betrays a lack of intelligence. The rejection of reason is cowardice and betrays a lack of faith.”
― Abraham Joshua Heschel