3 unrelated quotations (?)

1) O SON OF MAN!
Rejoice in the gladness of thine heart, that thou mayest be worthy to meet Me and to mirror forth My beauty. – from Baha’u’llah’s ‘Hidden Words’

2) I’m afraid of losing my obscurity. Genuineness only thrives in the dark. Like celery. – Aldous Huxley – Those Barren Leaves (1925).

‘Knowledge is a function of being When there…

‘Knowledge is a function of being. When there is a change in the being of the knower, there is a corresponding change in the nature and amount of knowing.’

Aldous Huxley p1 ‘The Perennial Philosophy’

Four key articles for understanding interfaith as inter-spirituality

1) Best introduction – https://universalistspirit.wordpress.com/about/extracts-from-interspirituality-bridging-the-religious-and-spiritual-traditions-of-the-world-by-william-keepin/

NB the whole of the book in which Keepin’s superb piece is free online HERE – http://www.satyana.org/pdf/SongoftheEartheBook.pdf

2) Mysticism as the Crossing of Ultimate Boundaries – by Wayne Teasdale – http://csp.org/experience/docs/teasdale-mysticism.html

3) The Mystical Core of Organized Religion – David Steindl-Rast – http://csp.org/experience/docs/steindl-mystical.html

4) Aldous Huxley’s Perennial Philosophy is HERE – https://archive.org/stream/perennialphilosp035505mbp#page/n5/mode/2up

You might also enjoy

Introduction to the Bhagavad-Gita (Translation of Bhagavad-Gita by Swami Prabhavananda and Christopher Isherwood.) by Aldous Huxley – http://parvati.tripod.com/perennial.html

TAGS: Aldous Huxley, interspirituality, Perennial Philosophy, inter-spirituality, interfaith, interfaith as inter-spirituality, Mysticism as the Crossing of Ultimate Boundaries, Wayne Teasdale, William Keepin, The Mystical Core of Organized Religion, David Steindl-Rast,

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I’m afraid of losing my obscurity. Genuineness only thrives in the dark. Like celery. – Aldous Huxley – Those Barren Leaves (1925). – cf –

Krishna the mouth piece of Hinduism in all…

Krishna, …….the mouth-piece of Hinduism in all its manifestations, finds it perfectly natural that different men should have different methods and even apparently differently objects of worship. All roads lead to Rome–provided, of course, that it is Rome and not some other city which the traveler really wishes to reach.

Aldous Huxley in Introduction to the Bhagavad Gita
(Translation of Bhagavad-Gita by Swami Prabhavananda and Christopher Isherwood.)