Robert Wolfe: on the missed fundamental keys of nondual Self-realization.

Omnipresent, infinite, eternal: Robert Wolfe on the missed fundamental keys of nondual Self-realization.

Robert Wolfe (www.livingnonduality.org) is the author of Living Nonduality, One Essence, Always-Only-One, and other titles on the nature of spiritual awakening known as enlightenment. In conversation with Tom Burt.

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Nonduality: – the six stanzas of the Atmashatkam or Nirvanashatkam

This video shows the six stanzas of the Atmashatkam or Nirvanashatkam which is written by Bhagwan Shri Adi Shankaracharya and the translation has been done by Swami Vivekananda. It explains the highest state of consciousness that can be achieved by a man. In the end, a small message describing the glory of Upanishads has been added. Enjoy! and always remain immersed in your glorious Self/Atman.

Another translation is;

1) I am not mind, nor intellect, nor ego, nor the reflections of inner self (citta). I am not the five senses. I am beyond that. I am not the ether, nor the earth, nor the fire, nor the wind (the five elements). I am indeed, That eternal knowing and bliss, the auspicious (Śivam), love and pure consciousness.

2) Neither can I be termed as energy (prāṇa), nor five types of breath (vāyus), nor the seven material essences, nor the five sheaths(pañca-kośa). Neither am I the five instruments of elimination, procreation, motion, grasping, or speaking. I am indeed, That eternal knowing and bliss, the auspicious (Śivam), love and pure consciousness.

3) I have no hatred or dislike, nor affiliation or liking, nor greed, nor delusion, nor pride or haughtiness, nor feelings of envy or jealousy. I have no duty (dharma), nor any money, nor any desire (kāma), nor even liberation (mokṣa). I am indeed, That eternal knowing and bliss, the auspicious (Śivam), love and pure consciousness.

4) I have neither merit (virtue), nor demerit (vice). I do not commit sins or good deeds, nor have happiness or sorrow, pain or pleasure. I do not need mantras, holy places, scriptures (Vedas), rituals or sacrifices (yajñas). I am none of the triad of the observer or one who experiences, the process of observing or experiencing, or any object being observed or experienced. I am indeed, That eternal knowing and bliss, the auspicious (Śivam), love and pure consciousness.

5) I do not have fear of death, as I do not have death. I have no separation from my true self, no doubt about my existence, nor have I discrimination on the basis of birth. I have no father or mother, nor did I have a birth. I am not the relative, nor the friend, nor the guru, nor the disciple. I am indeed, That eternal knowing and bliss, the auspicious (Śivam), love and pure consciousness.

6) I am all pervasive. I am without any attributes, and without any form. I have neither attachment to the world, nor to liberation (mukti). I have no wishes for anything because I am everything, everywhere, every time, always in equilibrium. I am indeed, That eternal knowing and bliss, the auspicious (Śivam), love and pure consciousness.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atma_Shatkam

BRAHMAN
In Hinduism, Brahman connotes the highest Universal Principle, the Ultimate Reality in the universe.

In major schools of Hindu philosophy it is the material, efficient, formal and final cause of all that exists.

It is the pervasive, genderless, infinite, eternal truth and bliss which does not change, yet is the cause of all changes.

Brahman as a metaphysical concept is the single binding unity behind the diversity in all that exists in the universe.

Brahman is a Vedic Sanskrit word, and is conceptualized in Hinduism, states Paul Deussen, as the “creative principle which lies realized in the whole world”.

Brahman is a key concept found in Vedas, and extensively discussed in the early Upanishads.

The Vedas conceptualize Brahman as the Cosmic Principle. In the Upanishads, it has been variously described as Sat-cit-ānanda (being-consciousness-bliss) and as the highest reality.

Brahman is discussed in Hindu texts with the concept of Atman (Soul, Self)

Ātman (/ˈɑːtmən/) is a Sanskrit word that means inner self or soul.

ATMAN
Atman means ‘eternal self’. The atman refers to the real self beyond ego or false self. It is often referred to as ‘spirit’ or ‘soul’ and indicates our true self or essence which underlies our existence.

There are many interesting perspectives on the self in Hinduism ranging from the self as eternal servant of God to the self as being identified with God.

The idea of atman entails the idea of the self as a spiritual rather than material being and thus there is a strong dimension of Hinduism which emphasises detachment from the material world
http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/hinduism/concepts/concepts_1.shtml

In Hindu philosophy, especially in the Vedanta school of Hinduism, Ātman is the first principle, the true self of an individual beyond identification with phenomena, the essence of an individual.

In order to attain liberation, a human being must acquire self-knowledge (atma jnana), which is to realize that one’s true self (Ātman).
(WP)

Atmashatkam or Nirvanashatkam – Shri Adi Shankaracharya

NOTE: Swami Vivekananda 12 January 1863 – 4 July 1902), born Narendranath Datta (Bengali: নরেন্দ্রনাথ দত্ত) (Bengali: [nɔrend̪ro nat̪ʰ d̪ɔt̪t̪o]), was an Indian Hindu monk, a chief disciple of the 19th-century Indian mystic Ramakrishna. He was a key figure in the introduction of the Indian philosophies of Vedanta and Yoga to the Western world[4] and is credited with raising interfaith awareness, bringing Hinduism to the status of a major world religion during the late 19th century.[5]

The nature of Baha’i respect for Guru Nanak and Sikhism

Guru Nanak ……… was endowed with a “saintly character” and “was inspired to reconcile the religions of Hinduism and Islam, the followers of which religions had been in violent conflict.”

The Bahá’ís thus view Guru Nanak as a ‘saint of the highest order’.

A saint in the words of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá is “one who leads a life of purity, one who has freed himself from all human weaknesses and imperfections.”

He continues, “Saints are men who have freed themselves from the world of matter and who have overcome sin. They live in the world but are not of it, their thoughts being continually in the world of the spirit. Their lives are spent in holiness, and their deeds show forth love, justice and godliness. They are illumined from on high; they are as bright and shining lamps in the dark places of the earth. These are the saints of God.”

I wonder how enlightened Sikhs view the Baha’i Faith?

Rupert Spira weaving love, beauty and presence and other wonderful no-things

‘The Seamless Intimacy Of Experience’ – Interview by Renate McNay

The two books referred to are – ‘Presence: The Seamless Intimacy Of Experience’ and ‘Presence: The Art Of Peace And Happiness’

Benjamin Zander: The transformative power of classical music – a TED talk.

Benjamin Zander has two infectious passions: classical music, and helping us all realize our untapped love for it — and by extension, our untapped love for all new possibilities, new experiences, new connections.

A not-to-be-missed piece on meaning-making as peace-building

Matt Talbot has written a fine piece, poetic at times, entitled ‘Some Thoughts on War for Memorial Day’ that sees war as apparently providing several forms of meaning-making. He argues, quite rightly in my world-view, that alternative ways to make meaning help those who mistakingly go to war to find peace-building alternatives

Matt builds his post around two quotations from Chris Hedges

The enduring attraction of war is this: Even with its destruction and carnage it can give us what we long for in life. It can give us purpose, meaning, a reason for living. Only when we are in the midst of conflict does the shallowness and vapidness of much of our lives become apparent. Trivia dominates our conversations and increasingly our airwaves. And war is an enticing elixir. It gives us resolve, a cause. It allows us to be noble. And those who have the least meaning in their lives, the impoverished refugees in Gaza, the disenfranchised North African immigrants in France, even the legions of young who live in the splendid indolence and safety of the industrialized world, are all susceptible to war’s appeal.

― Chris Hedges, Author of ‘War Is a Force That Gives Us Meaning’

Hedges again:

‘If we really saw war, what war does to young minds and bodies, it would be impossible to embrace the myth of war. If we had to stand over the mangled corpses of schoolchildren killed in Afghanistan and listen to the wails of their parents, we would not be able to repeat clichés we use to justify war. This is why war is carefully sanitized. This is why we are given war’s perverse and dark thrill but are spared from seeing war’s consequences. The mythic visions of war keep it heroic and entertaining…

The wounded, the crippled, and the dead are, in this great charade, swiftly carted offstage. They are war’s refuse. We do not see them. We do not hear them. They are doomed, like wandering spirits, to float around the edges of our consciousness, ignored, even reviled. The message they tell is too painful for us to hear. We prefer to celebrate ourselves and our nation by imbibing the myths of glory, honor, patriotism, and heroism, words that in combat become empty and meaningless.’

Two points from me;

He underestimates the war machine that operates to bring yet more wealth to the mega-rich who run society.

Secondly if Talbot develops the post further a mention might be made of one or two of those who have evolved similar theories such as Logotherapy which was developed by psychiatrist and holocaust survivor Viktor Frankl from his time in a concentration camp in which he observed those whom meaning making helped in their survival.

Talbot’s piece is not to be missed – https://vox-nova.com/2016/05/21/some-thoughts-on-war-for-memorial-day/

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Our harmony and at-one-ment rests on realizing our true purpose in this world, which is to live in the now or presence.

Roger founded the One Garden group network.

Scott Kiloby: on inattention as an object in awareness

Scott has written on ‘inattention’ in a very useful way that I haven’t seen elsewhere. It is helpful in relation to several nonduality teachers. For example it is useful in relation to the brilliantly successful definition of meditation given by Joan Tollifson;

“meditation is moment-to-moment presence that excludes nothing and sticks to nothing.”

Scott on ‘Inattention’

Notice when thought is referencing past, future, or resistance to now. These thoughts appear in awareness. When these thoughts appear, it feels like inattention. In other words, it feels like you are not here “in the now.” Is that really true?

Inattention is merely an object in awareness. It is a movement of thought, a dream of past, future, or resistance to now. In noticing that movement, notice that there is often another voice that comments on the inattention. This voice says that you should not be lost in your self-centered story.

The voice is trying to convince you that what is happening (i.e., inattention) should not be happening. Is that true? Is it true that something that is happening should not be happening including inattention? Is it true that thought should not arise? Only a thought would say that thought should not arise.

Instead of making a new self-centered story about whether you are or are not “present” enough, just notice what is. Noticing what is — including so-called “inattention” — allows what is to be just as it is.

A thought within the time-bound story and the subsequent thought that tells you that you should not be lost in that story are both appearances in awareness. Be clear that you are the awareness. In that clarity, it is seen that no appearance can take you away from what you are.

~ From: Reflections of the One Life, by Scott Kiloby http://www.kiloby.com/