What is the spiritual co-equivalent of the economic meaning of ‘a rising tide lifts all boats’?

It turns out that in today’s world the aphorism “a rising tide lifts all boats” is associated with the idea that improvements in the general economy will benefit all participants in that economy, and that economic policy, particularly government economic policy, should therefore focus on the general macroeconomic environment first and foremost. SEE – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_rising_tide_lifts_all_boats

But what is the spiritual co-equivalent of the economic meaning of ‘a rising tide lifts all boats’?

Perhaps it is everything from heroic figures such as William Wilberforce who dedicate his life to achieving the abolition of slavery in the UK parliament right through to you and me who decide to up our output of smiling?

‘Materialist Mammon’ steals the language of spirituality – we should do some re-claiming!

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Juxtaposition: light from Sufi, Buddhist & Jewish sources

Juxtaposition:

The first quotation is by from Sufi teacher Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee;

SUFI:
“If we can allow ourselves to live an ordinary life while also staying awake to the great void at the center of all that is, then we can be this intermediary place between that intoxicating, mystical bliss of oblivion and the wonder of how the Divine creates and reveals Itself in all the forms of life. Our lives are the expression of this bridge – ordinary and extraordinary, all things in their place, everything free to be as it is, and our consciousness, our heart, free to be used as needed.”
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BUDDHIST:
The great Master Dogen said, “To study the Buddha Way is to study the self, to study the self is to forget the self, and to forget the self is to be enlightened by the ten thousand things.” To be enlightened by the ten thousand things is to recognize the unity of the self and the ten thousand things.
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JEWISH:
The search for reason ends at the shore of the known;
on the immense expanse beyond it
only the sense of the ineffable can glide.
It alone knows the route to that
which is remote from experience and understanding.

Neither is amphibious:
reason cannot go beyond the shore,
and the sense of the ineffable
is out of place where we measure, where we weigh…….

Citizens of two realms, we must all sustain dual allegiance:
we sense the ineffable in one realm;
we name and exploit reality in another.
Between the two we set up a system of references,
but can never fill the gap. – A J Heschel
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NB The Sufi quote is from a book review on the wonderful ‘Spirituality & Practice site by Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat here;

http://www.spiritualityandpractice.com/book-reviews/excerpts/view/28020/for-love-of-the-real

Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee – his site is here – http://www.goldensufi.org/about_lvl.html

How important do you/I feel spiritually?

This is such a wonderful passage from Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee;

“If we can allow ourselves to live an ordinary life while also staying awake to the great void at the center of all that is, then we can be this intermediary place between that intoxicating, mystical bliss of oblivion and the wonder of how the Divine creates and reveals Itself in all the forms of life. Our lives are the expression of this bridge – ordinary and extraordinary, all things in their place, everything free to be as it is, and our consciousness, our heart, free to be used as needed.”

The Book review is of For Love of the Real
A Story of Life’s Mystical Secret
By Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee, Hilary Hart
A Sufi understanding of service and our lives as a bridge between the ordinary and the extraordinary.

From the Brussat’s book review;

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…….many of the great Zen and Taoist teachers emphasized the ordinary and the dangers of spiritual importance:

” Emperor Wu: ‘I have built many temples, copied innumerable Sutras and ordained many monks since becoming Emperor. Therefore, I ask you, what is my merit?’

“Bodhidharma: ‘None whatsoever!’

“Emperor Wu: ‘Why no merit?’

“Bodhidharma: ‘Doing things for merit has an impure motive and will only bear the puny fruit of rebirth.’

“Emperor Wu, a little put out: ‘What then is the most important principle of Buddhism?’

“Bodhidharma: ‘Vast emptiness. Nothing sacred.’

“Emperor Wu, by now bewildered, and not a little indignant: ‘Who is this that stands before me?’

“Bodhidharma: ‘I do not know.’

“If we can allow ourselves to live an ordinary life while also staying awake to the great void at the center of all that is, then we can be this intermediary place between that intoxicating, mystical bliss of oblivion and the wonder of how the Divine creates and reveals Itself in all the forms of life. Our lives are the expression of this bridge – ordinary and extraordinary, all things in their place, everything free to be as it is, and our consciousness, our heart, free to be used as needed.”

SOURCE: http://www.spiritualityandpractice.com/book-reviews/excerpts/view/28020

Breath Matters – Richard Rohr

from Richard Rohr’s ‘Hidden Things: Scripture As Spirituality’ as what he says calls for our reflection today.
“God’s eternal mystery cannot be captured or controlled, but only received and spoken as freely as the breath itself–the one single thing we have done since the moment we were born and will one day cease to do in this body! God is as available and accessible as our breath itself and no religion is going to be able to portion that out, control it or say who gets it.

Is not that the very meaning of Jesus’ dramatic breathing on them after the Resurrection (John 20:22)? The Spirit has been definitively promised by Jesus and is as available as the very air of life! You can stop reading this book now, because nothing else I might say will be any better than that.” (p.130)

http://reflectionsofanrscj.blogspot.co.uk/2008/02/blog-post.html

Richard Rohr * Malcolm Gladwell on wisdom and insight

Richard Rohr & Malcolm Gladwell on wisdom and insight

Richard Rohr says;

I am also convinced by what Malcolm Gladwell, in his 2006 best-seller, Blink, calls the phenomenon of ‘thin slicing’ in our human search for patterns and wisdom.

He believes that what we call insight or even genius comes from the ability of some people to “sift through the situation in front of them, throwing out all that is irrelevant, while zeroing in on what really matters.

The truth is that our unconscious is really good at this, to the point where thin-slicing often delivers a better answer than more deliberate and exhaustive ways of thinking.”

Richard Rohr – http://faithmatters.us/introducing-things-hidden/

TAGS: Richard Rohr, thin-slicing, Blink, Malcolm Gladwell, wisdom, insight, genius, unconsciousness,

Maureen Murdock ‘The Heroine’s Journey: Woman’s Quest for Wholeness’

“Women’s bodies are public domain, as evidenced clearly at the present time by the furor over abortion. Everyone has an opinion about what a woman should or should not do with her body. ”
― Maureen Murdock, The Heroine’s Journey: Woman’s Quest for Wholeness
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“Being is not passive; it takes focused awareness.”
― Maureen Murdock, The Heroine’s Journey: Woman’s Quest for Wholeness
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“Women have to learn where their true source of validation is.”
― Maureen Murdock, The Heroine’s Journey: Woman’s Quest for Wholeness
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“There is a danger in the repudiation of the feminine when the daughter who rejects the aspects of the negative feminine embodied by her mother also denies positive aspects of her own feminine nature, which are playful, sensuous, passionate, nurturing, intuitive, and creative. Many women who have had angry or emotional mothers seek to control their own anger and feelings lest they be seen as destructive and castrating. This repression of anger often prevents them from seeing the inequities in a male-defined system. Women who have seen their mothers as superstitious, religious, or old-fashioned discard the murky, mysterious, magical aspects of the feminine for cool logic and analysis. A chasm is created between the heroine and the maternal qualities within her; this chasm will have to be healed later in the journey for her to achieve wholeness.”
― Maureen Murdock, The Heroine’s Journey: Woman’s Quest for Wholeness

Trees are the earth’s endless effort to speak to the listening heaven

“Trees are the earth’s endless effort to speak to the listening heaven.”

― Rabindranath Tagore, Fireflies